Monday, June 3, 2013

Simple, Right?

Just a little video showing what I think is a no-brainer when it comes to bike lanes and right turning cars. Riding around town I often see cyclists and cars respecting that painted line way too much, to the detriment of both.
 

 
 
 
Comments welcome as always!

 
Yer Pal,
R A N T W I C K

9 comments:

Steve A said...

Plus one! I am surprised, however, that there was no mention about the debris in the bike lane that made your actions even SMARTER.

RoadQueen said...

Thanks Rantwick, I have to admit that this technique hasn't occurred to me. (Although I really don't do much 'city' riding.) Very sound advice in my opinion.

recumbent conspiracy theorist said...

Good tip Rantwick and nicely illustrated with the video. Makes complete sense to me.

RANTWICK said...

Thanks all. Nice to know I'm not crazy, at least in this regard.

anniebikes said...

Thank you for your insight. I never thought of doing this, but then again I would need to pay more attention to traffic behind the right turning vehicle to allow re-positioning.

I think many of us, myself included, get in the bike lane and think we're safe and let up on our overall traffic awareness. Your example gives me something to ponder...

RANTWICK said...

Annie - it is true you need to be conscious of overtaking traffic, and sometimes there just isn't a safe way to do it my way. The shoulder check alone, though, is often enough to back 'em off enough.

Anonymous said...

Good idea! I feel very safe in the bike lane but I think that is an illusion. We still need to have our wits about us as much as if we were taking the lane. Vicki from bicycles in Newcastle.

Ryan Zamaria said...

I do this occasionally, but here most will either wait behind me until I pass an intersection/drive-way OR they will pass me, indicate their turn and wait for me to pass on the right (or in most cases I wave them on to turn).

RANTWICK said...

Ryan,

Thanks for commenting! The same happens here mostly, but I find everybody gets to keep moving faster this way; less indecision or processing / slow down required.

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